Aloe Vera - Herbal Profile

June 7th, 2006

Identification:

A large succulent perennial plant with a strong fibrous root and a large stem supporting a rosette of fleshy, narrow, lanceolate leaves, green on both sides, bearing spiny teeth on the margins, and growing 1 to 2 feet long. The yellow to purplish drooping flowers grow in a long raceme at the top of the flower stalk, growing up to 4-1/2 feet high. The fruit is a triangular capsule containing numerous seeds.

Habitat:

It is native to East and South Africa and cultivated in the West Indies and other tropical areas throughout the world. Although there are over 200 species of aloe there are probably only three or four with medicinal properties. Of these, Aloe Vera barbadensis is the most potent.

Family: Liliaceae (Lily Family)

Other Names: Burn Plant, Medicine Plant, First Aid Plant, Lily Of The Dessert

Flowers: Most of the year

Parts Used: Leaves

Cultivation:

Keep in sandy soil that is well drained. Potted plants need filtered sun or full shade.

History:

The name was derived from Arabic meaning “bitter” because of the bitter liquid found in the leaves. In 1500 B.C. Egyptians recorded use of the herbal plant in treating burns, infections and Parasites. Egyptian Queens Cleopatra and Nefertiti both gave tribute to Aloe Vera as one of their most important Beauty secrets.

Alexander the Great carried the Aloe Vera plant into battle to treat wounded soldiers. The plant dates back 6,000 years, and has been in use for all that time. Ancient Greeks, Arabs and Spaniards have used the plant throughout the millennia. African hunters still rub the gel on their bodies to reduce Perspiration and their scent.

Constituents:

Hydroxyanthracene derivatives of the anthrone type (principally barbaloin); 7-hydroxyaloin isomers, aloe-emodin, chrysophanol and their glycosides; chromone derivatives (aloesin and its derivatives aloeresins A and C, and the aglycone aloesone.

Gel:

glucomannan (a polysaccharide), steroids, Organic acids, enzymes, antibiotic principles, Amino Acids, saponins, Minerals.

Medicinal Properties:

Properties:

Anti-inflammatory, anesthetic, antiseptic, emmenagogue (uterine stimulant), emollient, purgative, vulnerary.

Main Uses:

It is very wise to keep this plant in the kitchen. When the leaf is broken, its gel is placed on burns to relieve pain and prevent blisters. Aloe may reduce inflammation, decrease swelling and redness, and accelerate wound healing. Aloe can aid in keeping the skin supple, and has been used in the control of Acne and Eczema.

It can relieve itching due to insect bites and Allergies. It is also good for sunburn and skin irritation. Aloe’s healing power comes from increasing the availability of oxygen to the skin, and by increasing the synthesis and strength of tissue.

Aloe Vera contains many ingredients, including Vitamins, Minerals; seven of the eight essential Amino Acids, sugars - including the important muco-poly saccharides which act on the Immune System as well as helping to detoxify the body -and essential Fatty Acids.

Aloe Vera also contains Lignin which gives it its penetrative ability to reach deep into the skin; saponins which exert a powerful anti microbial effect against bacteria, viruses, fungi and yeasts such as Candida and anthraquinones, including aloin and emodin, which are strong painkillers and antibacterial, they are also powerful Laxatives.

Aloe contains at least three anti-inflammatory Fatty Acids that are helpful for the stomach, small intestine and colon. It naturally alkalizes digestive juices to prevent over acidity - a common cause of Indigestion. It helps cleanse the digestive tract by exerting a soothing, balancing effect.

Take in conjunction with antispasmodics or carminatives (anti-gas) such as Calamus or Angelica to counteract griping.

Caution:

Over dosage can cause Gastritis, Diarrhea and nephritis. As aloe stimulates uterine contractions, it should be avoided during Pregnancy. Also, because it is excreted in Breast Milk, it should be avoided during Lactation as it may be purgative to the child. Aloes should be taken for a maximum of 8-10 days.

Preparations:

Salve: Remove the thin outer skin and process the leaves in a blender, add 500 units of Vitamin C powder to each cup and store in refrigerator.

Tincture: 15 to 60 drops.

Dried Juice: Aloe Vera juice containing the equivalent of 360 - 900 mg of dried sap is recommended by most herbalists per day.

For Burns, Scalds, and Insect Bites: Break off a piece of the leaf and apply the juice directly to skin.

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Chicory - Herbal Profile

June 6th, 2006

Chicory (Cichorium intybus)

Identification:

Chicory is a perennial plant that is commonly cultivated and also found wild in the U.S. and Europe. The rootstock is light yellow outside, white inside, and, like the rest of the plant, contains a bitter, milky juice. The stiff, angular, branching stem bears lanceolate leaves that are coarsely toothed near the bottom of the plant, but entire higher up. The light-Blue to Violet-Blue, axillary or terminal flowerheads feature rays that are toothed at the ends.

Family: Compositae (Sunflower family)

Other Names: Succory, Wild chicory, Wild succory

Flowers: June - September

Parts Used: Roots and leaves

Habitat: Roadsides, fields, and waste places. Throughout our area. (Alien)

Medicinal Properties:

Properties: Appetizer, Cholagogue, Digestive, Diuretic, Tonic.

Main Uses:

Chicory is often recommended for jaundice and for spleen problems. The juice of the leaves and a tea made from the flowering plant promote the production of bile, the release of gallstones, and the elimination of excessive internal mucus. They are also useful for Gastritis, lack of appetite, and digestive difficulties. A decoction of the rootstock is said to be beneficial to the glandular organs of the digestive system. For painful inflammations, try applying the boiled leaves and flowers wrapped in a cloth.

Preparation And Dosages:

Gather the rootstock from March to May.

Decoction: Use 1 teaspoon rootstock or herb per 1/2 cup of cold water; bring to a boil and strain. Take 1 to 1-1/2 cups a day, a mouthful at a time.

Juice: Take 1 tablespoon in milk or water, three times a day. Chicory is also a wild food.

Nutrients (Per 100 grams) Calories - 20 Niacin - 0.5 mg. Riboflavin - 0.10mg. Calcium - 86 mg. Phosphorus - 40 mg. Thiamin - 0.06 mg. Fat - 0.3 grams. Potassium - 420 mg. Vitamin A - 4.000 IU Iron - 0.9 mg. Protein - 1.8 grams. Vitamin C - 22 mg.

Uses: Coffee, salad, cooked green.

The roots make an excellent coffee substitute, (without the caffeine), when roasted in an oven until dark brown and brittle, ground, and prepared like coffee; use roughly 1-1/2 teaspoons chicory for each cup of water. The very young leaves can be eaten fresh in salads and the older, bitter leaves can be boiled in several waters and eaten.

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For Guaranteed, Effective, 100% Natural Herbal Remedies , please visit Native Remedies

NaturalEco Organics is where we recommend you go for Organic, natural, chemical-free products and quality remedies for a safe, healthy journey for Mom and Baby, from Pregnancy to baby’s Nursery!

Mountain Rose Herbs is where NHH recommends you purchase all of your Bulk Herbs, Spices, Teas and single oils!

Are you looking for quality Vitamins, diet aids and health Supplements? Visit the Health Supplement Shop - highly recommended by NHH!

Starting an Herbal Garden

June 2nd, 2006

When planning an herbal garden it is important to decide what Herbs you want to grow. Then decide where you’re going to plant them. Will it be indoors or outdoors? Is there enough sunlight? Is the soil loose with good drainage or very firm and rocky? And so on; these are just a few things you will want to consider in the planning stage.

Once you have decided what Herbs you want, it’s a good idea to seperate them into groups. Seperate the perennials from the annuals, and seperate the Herbs that will need full sun from the ones that grow well in partial shade. It’s a good idea to plant the taller Herbs in back and the shorter ones in front of the garden so that all may benefit from good sunlight. Be sure to make space between the rows. This is important so that you can reach all the plants for watering and upkeep. I place stepping stones in my garden. They not only look very nice, but I find it easier for upkeep and harvesting.

THE RIGHT SOIL

When I decided to start my herb bed, I walked out to the yard and looked at the area I wanted to plant my Herbs in. I dug up a small portion of the soil. To say it was slightly less than perfect would be a masterpiece of understatement. It was too firm and rocky, with a mild to moderate amount of Clay. This a common soil problem in many areas. A good remedy for this is to till up the soil and add equal parts of peat,fertilizer, and compost. I also added some perlite and a small amount of sawdust. Peat is made up of old plant material and it is on the acidic side and it comes from bogs. Perlite is a volcanic mineral. You have seen it as those little white beads in potting soil. Compost is made up of old clippings and food material mixed together and left to combine over several months. Fertilizer is usually made up of manure, and can be obtained at any Nursery. Mix all of these well with the outdoor soil. This combination is also good for using in raised beds along! with the usual top soil or potting soil.

Another good idea for planting in poor soil is to plant in Clay pots and bury them 2/3 into the ground. An advantage to this is in the fall you can always dig them up and bring them indoors for maintenance through the winter months. A word of caution if you choose to use Clay pots. You’ll want to make sure that they are very clean and free of bacteria before you use them. You can clean them by submerging them in a mix of 1 part bleach and 9 parts very hot but not boiling water. Let them soak for several hours then rinse well and allow them to air dry.You can clean your garden tools in much the same way. Or you can wipe them off with rubbing alcohol and let them air dry.

After cleaning the pots, paint the insides with lead free cement paint. This will prevent the water from being absorbed into the soil around the pots. There is no need to paint the pots if you’re keeping them indoors.

PLANTING

If you are growing from seeds, it’s best to start in early March, so the seedlings will be ready for planting in early May. Follow the package instructions as to how deep to plant the seeds. Another way to start from seeds is called presprouting. Wet a paper towel and place the seeds on it then cover it with another wet paper towel. Place it in a sealed plastic bag. If kept in a warm spot the seeds should begin to sprout within a couple of days. Then place them into the soil. Be sure the seed plants have at least 12 to 14 hours of good sunlight each day. If you live in a cooler area and it’s not possiable to leave the plants outside then a good plant light will do just as well. If you plan to keep your herb garden indoors in pots, then a plant light would be a very good investment, unless you have a large window with alot of warmth and sunlight. I almost always plant under the Cancer moon. This is generally a good moon for planting almost anything.

BUG PROBLEMS?

One very important point to be aware of if you’re planting hebs for comsumption, never never use a chemical pesticide on them. You don’t want to eat that stuff. I always use an insecticidal Soap in my herb garden and in the pots I keep outside. You can find them at most nurseries and they are environmentally friendly.

Another problem you might come across is mildew. It looks like a white powder on the leaves. If you see this starting you will have to pull the whole plant and some of the surrounding soil as well. Whatever you do, don’t throw any diseased plants into your compost heap. It will infect the whole thing. Be sure to keep the plants well trimmed for good air Circulation. Sunlight is also important for keeping them dry. Another problem is called “Damping Off” I didn’t know what this was when I first saw it in the garden. It looked awful. It’s a fungus infection on the plants that kills them just after they are planted. Like mildew it is caused by too much moisture. Again you will have to pull up the plant along with some of the surrounding soil. If the plant is in a pot make sure that you clean the pot as stated earlier. The person I spoke with at the local Nursery here, who is also an herbalist, told me to water the new plants with a combination of Chamomile and nett! le tea. It helps to kill the fungus until they are ready to be planted outside.

HARVESTING

When harvesting your Herbs it’s best to harvest them when they are dry. For flower harvesting, take them only after they have bloomed. The only exception that I know of is with Lavender. Harvest Lavender before the buds open if possiable. For harvesting leaves be sure to take them before the flowers start to bloom if you can. When harvesting roots, dig them up in the fall, making sure you leave some to regrow next year. When harvesting seeds wait until the seeds are just starting to fall off the plants. For drying your Herbs just snip off a few sprigs from the plant and tie them into small bundles and hang them to dry in a cool dry area. You can also dry them by laying them on a flat rack made out of window screening. This way air will circulate on all sides of the plants. I recommend the rack method for drying the roots. It works much better for them.

STORING YOUR Herbs

Once the Herbs are dried you can store them in clean dark glass jars with tight fitting lids. If you don’t have dark glass jars just use the regular canning jars. Sometimes they are called Mason Jars. Another way of storing them is in a clean tin can with a tight fitting lid. Then you can enjoy your home grown Herbs for months to come. Good luck and happy gardening

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For Guaranteed, Effective, 100% Natural Herbal Remedies , please visit Native Remedies

NaturalEco Organics is where we recommend you go for Organic, natural, chemical-free products and quality remedies for a safe, healthy journey for Mom and Baby, from Pregnancy to baby’s Nursery!

Mountain Rose Herbs is where NHH recommends you purchase all of your Bulk Herbs, Spices, Teas and single oils!

Are you looking for quality Vitamins, diet aids and health Supplements? Visit the Health Supplement Shop - highly recommended by NHH!

Herbs In The Shade

May 25th, 2006

I’ve been turning a “wild area” right off our front yard into a shade area with a bench and a birdbath. I’m leaving the native ferns and wildflowers when I can and adding hostas, columbines and bleeding hearts. I also decided to mix in Herbs that prefer shade. You may have a similar area, so I thought I would share what Herbs will do well.

There are others that will tolerate a little shade but these are the Herbs that should do well. My area has three younger oak trees that shade it, but there are also spots with quite a bit of sun where I can mix in a few sun loving Herbs as well.

When you plant in shade you want to make sure their is plenty of Organic material added to the soil. As a general rule I don’t fertilize my Herbs, but if you need to be sure to use an Organic fertilizer. Also, be aware that the sweet woodruff, violets, and mints will spread.

If you have enough room that’s okay. If not, keep an eye on them and dig up to transfer when you see the volunteers. Mints can be planted in big pots and buried for control. If you want to add some color you can add foxgloves, nicotiana, schizanthus, Wishbone flower (torenia fournieri), mimulus (monkey flower), astilbe or daylilies.

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For Guaranteed, Effective, 100% Natural Herbal Remedies , please visit Native Remedies

NaturalEco Organics is where we recommend you go for Organic, natural, chemical-free products and quality remedies for a safe, healthy journey for Mom and Baby, from Pregnancy to baby’s Nursery!

Mountain Rose Herbs is where NHH recommends you purchase all of your Bulk Herbs, Spices, Teas and single oils!

Are you looking for quality Vitamins, diet aids and health Supplements? Visit the Health Supplement Shop - highly recommended by NHH!

The Benefits of Activated Charcoal

May 13th, 2006

Charcoal is an amazing substance. It adsorbs more poisons than any other substance known to mankind.

It can adsorb lead acetate, strychnine, DDT, many drugs (including cocaine, iodine, penicillin, aspirin, phenobarbital), and inorganic substances (chlorine, lead, and mercury).

It can adsorb thousands of times its own weight in gases, heavy metals, poisons, and other chemicals; thus it renders them ineffective and harmless.

It can adsorb intestinal gas and deodorizes foul-smelling gases of various kinds.

Charcoal can do these various things because of its ability to attract other substances to its surface and hold them there. This is called “adsorption” (not absorption). Charcoal can adsorb thousands of times its own weight in harmful substances. One teaspoonful of it has a surface area of more than 10,000 square feet.

The British medical journal, Lancet, discusses the amazing ability of the human skin to allow transfer of liquids, gases, and even micro-particles through its permeable membrane and pores, by the application of moist, activated charcoal compresses and poultices which actually draw bacteria and poisons through the skin and into the poultice or compress! The article describes the use of charcoal compresses to speed the healing of wounds and eliminate their odors. But the poultices must be kept moist and warm for this healing process to occur.

Ancient Egyptian doctors, as well as Hippocrates (the Greek physician), recommended the use of charcoal for medicinal purposes. North American Indians used it for gas pains and skin infections. It eases inflammation and Bruises.

A 1981 research study found that activated charcoal reduces the amount of gas produced by eating beans and other gas-forming foods. It adsorbs the excess gas, along with the bacteria which form the gas.

Activated charcoal helps eliminate Bad Breath, because it cleanses both the mouth and the digestive tract. It also helps to purify the blood.

It relieves symptoms of nervous Diarrhea, traveler�s Diarrhea (turista), spastic colon, Indigestion, and peptic ulcers. For such problems, take between 1-1� tablespoons of powdered charcoal up to 3 times a day. Because food will reduce its effectiveness, take it between meals. Swirl the charcoal in a glass of water and then drink it down; or mix it with Olive Oil and spoon it into your mouth..

Charcoal was placed in gas masks during World War I; and it effectively counteracted poison gas.

Bad odors, caused by skin ulcers, have been eliminated by placing charcoal-filled cloth over plastic casts. It has been used externally to effectively adsorb wound secretions, bacteria, and Toxins. And, in poultices and packs, it treats infections of the face, eyelids, skin, or extremities.

It is one of the best substances in poultices for mushroom poisoning, insect stings, brown recluse spider bites, Black widow bites, and various types of snake bites.

It is used in water purification, air purification, and for removing undesirable odors and impurities in food.

Charcoal is the most-used remedy when many different types of poisons may have been swallowed. It is also used for Diarrhea and Indigestion.

It is used for jaundice of the Newborn, poison oak and ivy reactions, and many other illnesses.

All research studies show charcoal to be harmless when it is accidently inhaled, swallowed, or in contact with the skin. (But if enough is swallowed, it can cause a mild Constipation.) No Allergies to it have been reported. But it is best not to take charcoal longer than 12 weeks without stopping. Do not take it regularly for long periods of time.

Charcoal from burned toast should never be used; since substances are present which are carcinogenic. Do not eat burned food. Charcoal briquettes are especially dangerous, because petro-chemicals have been added to them.

The most effective type of charcoal is the activated form. This process renders it 2 to 3 times as effective as regular charcoal. First, the charcoal is ground very fine; and then it is placed in a steam chamber. This opens up the charcoal and exposes more of its surfaces, so it can adsorb much more.

Modern medical science uses Activated Charcoal USP, a pure, naturally produced wood charcoal carbon that has no carcinogenic properties.

It must be stored in a tightly sealed container, because it readily adsorbs impurities from the atmosphere. (Leaving the top off a container of charcoal will partially purify the room it is in, to the degree that the air in the room comes in contact with the charcoal.)

Simply place some in water, stir, and swallow. Or apply it to the skin�s surface. It is odorless and tasteless. Powdered, activated charcoal achieves maximum adsorption within a minute or so after absorption.

Charcoal can also be placed in empty gelatin capsules and swallowed. (Gelatin is usually processed from animals.) But they will act more slowly than swallowing the powder mixed with water. Charcoal can also be mixed with a little fruit juice before being swallowed; but, of course, it will adsorb that also. This should not be a problem if the juice is diluted or there is a sufficient amount of charcoal in it.

Charcoal poultices that are kept moist and warm actually draw Toxins and poisons out through the skin tissue. This is because skin is a permeable membrane, which permits a variety of liquids and gases to enter and exit the body.

Make the poultice just large enough to cover the injured part. The paste may be made by mixing equal parts of Flaxseed meal or corn starch with the activated charcoal, in a bowl, and then adding just enough hot water to make a moderately thick paste. Then spread the paste over a porous cloth, covering over the top with another layer of that same cloth.

Place the poultice over the area to be treated and cover it with a piece of plastic. Cover or wrap with a cloth, to hold it all in place. Secure by a tie, stretch bandage, or pin.

Apply the poultice for 1 or 2 hours. If applied at bedtime, leave it on overnight. Adsorption takes place almost immediately. When it is removed, wash or gently cleanse the area with cool water. Repeat when needed. Poultices should, at the most, be changed every 6-10 hours. Do not put charcoal directly on the broken skin; because it may cause a tatooing effect, blackening the skin for a period of time.

Activated charcoal is required by law to be part of the standard equipment on many ambulances, in case poisoning is encountered. It is the first choice of the medical profession.

Scientific experiments, conducted over a period of many years, attest to the effectiveness of charcoal as an antidote. In one experiment, 100 times the lethal dose of cobra venom was mixed with charcoal and injected into a laboratory animal. The animal was not harmed.

In other experiments, arsenic and strychnine were thoroughly mixed with charcoal and then swallowed by humans under laboratory conditions. The subjects survived, even though the poison dosages were 5 to 10 times the lethal dose.

Because medicinal drugs are chemical compounds, they are all poisons to a greater or lesser degree. Because of this, if charcoal is taken with them, or soon afterward, it will tend to adsorb and inactivate the drugs. Therefore, physicians recommend that you only take charcoal two hours before or two hours after taking a medicinal drug.

Physicians primarily use charcoal for eight different purposes. Here they are:

1 - To treat poisonous bites from snakes, spiders, and insects (38). 2 - To treat poisonings in general, as well as overdoses of aspirin, Tylenol, and other drugs. 3 - To treat some forms of dysentery, Diarrhea, dyspepsia, and foot-and-mouth disease. 4 - To disinfect and deodorize wounds. 5 - To eliminate toxic by-products that cause anemia in Cancer patients. 6 - To filter Toxins from the blood in liver and kidney diseases. 7 - To purify blood in transfusions.

Although activated charcoal can be used as an antidote in poisoning from most drugs and chemicals, it will not be effective against the following: cyanide, alcohol, caustic alkalies (such as lye), mineral acids, or boric acids. Strong alkaline and acid poisons need to be treated with solutions with the opposite pH.

For example, until the ambulance arrives, calcium powder in water will help offset acids and vinegar will help offset alkalies. Consult a Poison Control Center (phone numbers are in the front of your phone book) or a doctor immediately, for instructions and information in any poisoning emergency.

When mixed with water and swallowed to counteract poisoning, charcoal adsorbs the poison or drug, inactivating it. It then carries it inert through the entire length of the digestive tract and out of the body. Charcoal is not absorbed, adsorbed, neutralized, nor metabolized by the body.

In a poisoning emergency, if the victim is conscious, first induce vomiting (unless he has swallowed an acid) if it can be done quickly. Ipecac is a commonly used emetic. The dosage is � oz. for children and 1 oz. for adults. Induced vomiting will bring up about 30% of the poison from the stomach.

Then give the charcoal to help inactivate the remaining 70%. The usual dose is 5-50 grams of charcoal, depending on age and body size. Adults should be given at least 30 grams (about half a cup of lightly packed powder), depending on the amount of poison ingested. Larger doses will be needed if the person has eaten a meal recently.

A dose of 200 grams (3� cups) is not excessive in cases of severe poisoning. The charcoal will reach its maximum rate of adsorption within one minute. The sooner it is given, the more complete will be the adsorption of the poison. Always keep a large jar of activated charcoal in your kitchen! The dose can be repeated every four hours or until charcoal appears in the stool.

Never give charcoal, or anything else, to an unconscious person to swallow. Contact a physician or ambulance immediately.

Do not give charcoal before giving an emetic (to get him to vomit), because the charcoal will neutralize the emetic. Remember that charcoal will not work in cases of poisoning by strong acids or alkalies.

Here is a sampling of over 100 substances which are adsorbed by charcoal:

Acetaminophen / Aconitine / Amitriptyline / hydrochloride / Amphetamine / Antimony / Antipyrine / Arsenic / Aspirin / Atropine / Barbital, Barbiturates / Ben-Gay / Benzodiazepines / Cantharides / Camphor / Chlordane / Chloroquine / Chlorpheniramine / Chlorpromazine / Cocaine / Colchicine / Congesprin / Contact / Dalmane / Darvon / Delphinium / Diazepam / 2-, 4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid / Digitalis (Foxglove) / Dilantin / Diphenylhydantoin / Diphenoxylates / Doriden / Doxepin / Elaterin / Elavil / Equanil / Ergotamine / Ethchlorvynol / Gasoline / Glutethimide / Golden chain / Hemlock / Hexachlorophene / Imipramine / Iodine / Ipecac / Isoniazid / Kerosene / Lead acetate / Malathion / Mefenamic acid / Meprobamate / Mercuric chloride / Mercury / Methylene Blue / Methyl salicylate / Miltown / Morphine / Multivitamins and Minerals / Muscarine / Narcotics / Neguvon / Nicotine / Nortriptyline / Nytol / Opium / Oxazepam / Parathion / Penicillin / Pentazocine / Pentobarbital / Pesticides / Phenobarbital / Phenolphthalein / Phenol / Phenothiazines / Phenylpropanolamine / Placidyl / Potassium permanganate / Primaquine / Propantheline / Propoxyphene / Quinacrine / Quinidine / Quinine / Radioactive substances / Salicylamide / Salicylates / secobarbital / Selenium / Serax / Silver / Sinequan / Sodium Salicylate / Sominex / Stramonium / Strychnine / Sulfonamides / Talwin / Tofranil / Tree tobacco / Yew / Valium / Veratrine / Some silver and antimony salts / Many herbicides

Therapeutic Action: Activated Charcoal works by ADSORPTION, which is an Electrical Action, rather than Absorption, which is a Mechanical Action. Activated Charcoal ADSORBS MOST Organic and Inorganic Chemicals, that do NOT belong in the Body, but it does NOT ADSORB Nutrients!

Formula: To make an Activated Charcoal Slurry, you must:

  1. Add 1 tsp. of Activated Charcoal Powder to an 8 oz. Glass of PURE Water and stir.

NOTE: LOWER the Dosage to 1/2 tsp. or ADD Psyllium Husks, if the Person, who NEEDS help, has a tendency to become Constipated. And drink through a Straw, if the grittiness is a Problem.

Formula: To make Activated Charcoal Poultice, you must:

  1. Use EQUAL amounts of Activated Charcoal Powder with Flaxseed Meal. Blend in blender, the amount of Seed NEEDED to make the Meal.

  2. Place the 2 Powders in a dry bowl and add Water SLOWLY as you stir, mixing into a Toothpaste consistency.

NOTE: 2 tablespoons of each Powder will take approximately 5 or 6 tablespoons of Water. This amount of Poultice Paste would make a Poultice approximately 6 x 6 inches.

  1. Reach a DESIRED Consistency, that is NOT TOO WET to run all over, NOT TOO DRY to fall apart), and spread it EVENLY over a Macroporous Cloth, such as an UNBLEACHED (preferably) Paper Towel or a Cotton Cloth.

  2. Must now place the top of your Poultice “sandwich” over the Activated Charcoal laden bottom layer.

  3. Cover with a soft-type Cling Wrap (Saran Wrap).

  4. Place over DESIRED Area of the Skin to be treated (Sandwich on the Skin with the Saran Wrap over the top).

  5. Wrap Saran Wrap, a Towel, or a stretch-type (Ace) Bandage around to secure the Sandwich in place.

  6. Leave Activated Charcoal Poultice in place overnight or at least 1-2 hours, if applied during the day.

  7. Always DISCARD an Activated Charcoal Poultice after use. Do NOT REUSE it!

NOTE: The Activated Charcoal Poultice can be made SMALL by using a Bandaid or made LARGE by using a Cotton Sheet.

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For Guaranteed, Effective, 100% Natural Herbal Remedies , please visit Native Remedies

NaturalEco Organics is where we recommend you go for Organic, natural, chemical-free products and quality remedies for a safe, healthy journey for Mom and Baby, from Pregnancy to baby’s Nursery!

Mountain Rose Herbs is where NHH recommends you purchase all of your Bulk Herbs, Spices, Teas and single oils!

Are you looking for quality Vitamins, diet aids and health Supplements? Visit the Health Supplement Shop - highly recommended by NHH!

The Art of Poultices

May 13th, 2006

Herbal poultices were relied on in our grandparent�s day to ward off more life threatening afflictions like pleurisy, Bronchitis and pneumonia. An old stand-by was the Mustard poultice which was thought to “burn out” a pulmonary infection.

The 1867 British Pharmacopoeia lists the instructions for making a Cataplasm sinapsis or poultice. Two and a half ounces of powdered linseed (Flax Seed) is mixed with two and a half ounces of powdered Mustard and hot water is added to make a paste. Put the linseed, into a coffee grinder for a minute to bruise the seed sufficiently to improve its drawing qualities.

Mustard can be obtained at the grocery store where it is still sold in little tin boxes. This mixture is then applied to a clean cotton cloth and placed face down on the chest over the lung and bronchial area. Do not leave it on the skin too long. Three to five minutes is enough for the first treatment. Make sure that all Mustard is washed off. Keep the patient warm during the whole process.

Between poultices, oil of Eucalyptus can be massaged on the chest, helping to disinfect the lungs. Yarrow, Elderflower and Peppermint tea breaks up catarrhal congestion.

Comfrey Poultice for Broken Bones

In days of yore, Comfrey (Symphytum officinale) was called “knitbone.” It was used to help mend broken bones and fractures. The plant contains alantoin, which heals bone tissue. I have seen outstanding results when Comfrey poultices are used to heal broken hips in elderly people.

To make a Comfrey poultice, the leaves and stems should be gathered before midday, while the alkaloids are lowest in the plant. Pass them through a juicer and then remix the juice and pulp. Spread onto a piece of clean cotton, the size of the area to be healed. Place face down on the skin with Towels around it to protect from staining underwear or furniture. Leave for two hours and apply twice a day for several weeks. It�s a messy, time consuming process.

Sitting still for four hours each day with a Comfrey poultice often brings complaints from the patient, but the long term results are certainly worth the trouble. It should be noted that Comfrey poultices are not advisable for healing open wounds and deep cuts as they heal the surface very quickly, possibly leaving lower layers to fester and abscess.

Kelp Soothes Arthritic Joints

The English physiomedicalist herbalist, Albert Priest, pioneered the use of kelp poultices for arthritic joints. Because kelp (Fucus vesiculosus) contains such a wealth of trace Minerals and micronutrients, it is capable of “remineralizing” joint tissue which is notoriously poor in Circulation. Kelp also works on swelling, drawing out inflammation and easing pain. By supplying local nutrition for reconstruction, it gradually resolves inflammatory joint conditions locally.

Kelp plaster or poultice is made by covering a quantity of powdered kelp with cold pressed Olive Oil and allowing it to be “digested” in a warm place for 48 hours. The paste-like mixture is then spread onto a clean piece of cotton and applied to the joint face down. It is then wrapped with plastic to keep it from drying out. It can be taped in place since it must remain in contact with the skin for 24 hours or more. The patient doesn�t have to remain immobile if the plaster is firmly affixed.

After removal, the area should be further poulticed for seven or eight minutes with alternating hot and cold water poultices to flush the tissue and help remove Toxins. The kelp poultices can be repeated every two days. Good results are often achieved using this method for knees and hands. But the effects will be permanent only if the patient avoids sugar, salt, refined carbohydrates and acid forming foods such as pork and beef.

The application of herbal poultices externally can be every bit as effective as taking them by mouth. Not only does the local application concentrate the medicament precisely in the area to be healed; it also provides rapid decongestion of the area, improved local Circulation, antibacterial and scarring activity, and regenerative stimulation.

Although to our fast world of instant fixes, herbal poulticing may seem outdated and hardly worth the trouble required for preparation, it can often save time in the long run, as well as resolve infections and inflammations that may be resistant to antibiotics and antiinflammatories.

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Cabbage Can Heal?

May 13th, 2006

We all know that cabbages are highly nutritious but did you know cabbage has many healing properties and can be used for many different conditions?

Cabbage juice is great for relief of all sorts of ulcers, from peptic ulcers to skin ulcers. The juice can also be used on burns, bites, cold sores and Acne. The cabbage leaf is both soothing and antiseptic, also having the ability to draw out Toxins from the skin.

A poultice can be made from cabbage leaves and used on such conditions as: wounds, burns, boils, Bruises, ulcers, blisters, stings, cold sores, shingles, and Headaches. Cabbage leaves have a good reputation for relieving sore and inflamed breast during Breastfeeding. Its anti-inflammatory properties make it idea for relief of swollen joints.
The poultice can also be used to help soothe harsh coughs.

To make a cabbage poultice: remove the ribs from the greenest leaves, Soak in warm to hot water to soften the leaves. Crush with a rolling pin, then wrap the area using a bandage or cling wrap to hold the cabbage in place. This can be left for a few hours.

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For Guaranteed, Effective, 100% Natural Herbal Remedies , please visit Native Remedies

NaturalEco Organics is where we recommend you go for Organic, natural, chemical-free products and quality remedies for a safe, healthy journey for Mom and Baby, from Pregnancy to baby’s Nursery!

Mountain Rose Herbs is where NHH recommends you purchase all of your Bulk Herbs, Spices, Teas and single oils!

Are you looking for quality Vitamins, diet aids and health Supplements? Visit the Health Supplement Shop - highly recommended by NHH!

Garlic - Ways To Use For Illness and Injury

May 13th, 2006

First, go to the garden (or the grocery store) and bring home a couple bulbs of Garlic. A bulb is the golf-ball size pod of the plant, which can be separated into many Cloves�shaped like the individual wedges taken from an Orange. Break off two or three large Cloves, and lay them on your counter. Set some water on the stove to warm, and then spread out a clean washcloth or double-thick paper towel. Smack the Garlic Cloves with the bottom of a heavy glass to lightly bruise or crush them. Now the papery skin will come off easily. Take the bruised Cloves and dice them up, or smash them in a Garlic press so that the juice billows out the familiar aroma that makes you hungry for Lasagna.

Lay the 2-3 tablespoons of minced Garlic in the center of your washcloth or paper towel, and fold in the edges of the cloth, creating what I call a �poultice� or �plaster.� Place this Garlic pad in a bowl or plate and pour warm (not hot) water over it. Let it sit for 5 seconds or so, then drain and squeeze the excess water out with your hands. Apply the warm (not hot!) poultice to the chest, back, and soles of the feet (alternately) for about 60 seconds each for treatment of any virus, cold, flu, infection, etc…

Garlic poultices can also be used for earaches�placing crushed Garlic or a Garlic poultice against the infected ear. Also, a Clove of Garlic wedged in the ear like an old fashioned hearing aid works great for earaches (but be careful not to leave too long, or you will burn the skin!)

For flesh wound infections, hold against the wound lightly for about two minutes. Repeat several times a day.

To treat eye infections, hold poultice over the tightly closed eye for about two minutes. Careful! This burns really bad if it gets in the eye.

Warm Garlic oil is also healing and comforting in an ear when there is an infection. The oil is made by adding a few drops of Olive Oil to a tiny bit of fresh crushed Garlic, let sit for a few minutes, then strain out all the Garlic and discard. The oil that goes in the ear must be free of any visible particles. You will have enough for one application of warm Garlic oil for an earache. I always make mine fresh.

Do not make it too strong, because it can burn the skin. Experiment on the inside of your arm to see how strong or how long you can leave the Garlic on your skin without it burning. It can literally blister your skin (chemical heat.)

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For Guaranteed, Effective, 100% Natural Herbal Remedies , please visit Native Remedies

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How To Make Garlic Oil

May 13th, 2006

Therapeutic Action: Garlic is Anti-Bacterial, Anti-Viral and Anti-Fungal and Olive Oil is an Emollient. This oil can be used for abrasians, cuts, earaches and boils.

Formula: Garlic Oil is made by the following Method:

  1. Start to make the Oil, if possible, on a NEW Moon.
  2. Fill a shallow Bowl or Soup Dish with finely chopped Garlic Cloves.
  3. Pour enough RAW Organic EXTRA VIRGIN Olive Oil to COVER the Garlic.
  4. Cover the Bowel/Dish with Cheesecloth to KEEP the Dust OUT.
  5. PRESS and STRAIN OFF the Oil Mixture through Cheesecloth or Cotton Muslin Cloth on the following FULL Moon.
  6. BOTTLE it.

NOTE: Whenever taking ANY Plant Oil, such as Olive Oil, internally or using it externally, please be SURE to obtain it from an UNOPENED container, if it has NOT been REFRIGERATED! And once the container has been OPENED, then please be SURE to REFRIGERATE the Wheat Germ Oil, thus ensuring that the Oil does NOT become doing MORE HARM, than BENEFIT for the Body!!

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For Guaranteed, Effective, 100% Natural Herbal Remedies , please visit Native Remedies

NaturalEco Organics is where we recommend you go for Organic, natural, chemical-free products and quality remedies for a safe, healthy journey for Mom and Baby, from Pregnancy to baby’s Nursery!

Mountain Rose Herbs is where NHH recommends you purchase all of your Bulk Herbs, Spices, Teas and single oils!

Are you looking for quality Vitamins, diet aids and health Supplements? Visit the Health Supplement Shop - highly recommended by NHH!

Making and Using a Poultice

May 13th, 2006

A poultice is made of a soft, moist substance that is mixed to the consistency of a paste, and then spread on or between layers of cloth. The cloth is then placed on a body surface. Poultices act by increasing blood flow, relaxing tense muscles, soothing inflamed tissues, or drawing Toxins from an infected area.

Thus, they can be used to relieve the pain and inflammation associated with abscesses; boils; Bruises; carbuncles; fibrocystic disease; fractures; enlarged glands in the neck, breast or prostate; leg ulcers; sprains; sunburn; tumors; and ulcerated eyelids. They are also used to break up congestion, draw out pus, and remove embedded particles from the skin.

PROCEDURE

An herbal poultice may be made with dried or fresh Herbs. The two types of poultices are prepared in slightly different ways. (For information on choosing the best herbal poultice for your condition, as well as cautions regarding the use of specific Herbs, see Types of Poultices.

PREPARING A DRIED HERB POULTICE

If you are using dried Herbs, use a mortar and pestle to grind the Herbs to a powder. Place the Herbs in a bowl, and add enough warm water to make a thick paste that can be easily applied. Make a quantity sufficient to cover the affected area. The ratio of ground Herbs to water will vary according to the herb being used. Add the water in small increments, just until the mixture is thick but not stiff.

Arrange a clean piece of gauze, muslin, linen, or white cotton sheeting on a clean, flat surface. The material should be large enough to cover the affected area completely. Spread the herbal paste over the cloth. Cleanse the affected area with hydrogen peroxide, and place the poultice over the area. Wrap a towel or plastic wrap around the poultice to prevent the soiling of clothes or Sheets. Use a pin or other fastener to secure the poultice in place.

PREPARIING A FRESH HERB POULTICE

If using fresh Herbs for your poultice, place 2 ounces of the whole herb - about 1/2 cup - and 1 cup of water in a small saucepan. Simmer for 2 minutes. Do not drain.

Arrange a clean piece of gauze, muslin, linen, or white cotton sheeting on a clean, flat surface. The material should be large enough to cover the affected area completely. Pour the herbal solution over the cloth. Cleanse the affected area with hydrogen peroxide, and place the poultice over the area. Wrap a towel or plastic wrap around the poultice to prevent the soiling of clothes or Sheets. Use a pin or other fastener to secure the poultice in place.

TREATMENT DURATION

Herbal poultices should be kept in place for 1 to 24 hours, as needed. During this period, you may experience a throbbing pain as the poultice draws out infection and neutralizes Toxins. When the pain subsides, you will know that the poultice has accomplished its task and should be removed. Apply fresh poultices as needed until the desired level of healing has been reached. Wash the skin thoroughly after each poultice is removed.

TYPES OF POULTICES

By making your poultice with the appropriate Herbs or other substances, you will help ensure that the treatment is effective. Herbs commonly used in poultices are listed below, along with the conditions for which they are appropriate.

Note that when the mixture used to make the poultice contains an irritant, such as Mustard, it should not come into direct contact with the skin, but should be placed between pieces of cloth.

Chaparral, Dandelion, and Yellow Dock: Can be used to treat skin disorders such as Acne, Eczema, itchy or dry skin, Psoriasis, and rashes. You can use one herb, or combine two or three. The greatest benefit will be obtained from using all three. Use chaparral only if you grow it yourself or purchase it from a reputable Organic grower.

Elderberry: Can relieve pain associated with hemorrhoids.

Fenugreek, Flaxseed, and Slippery Elm: Can be combined to treat inflammation. Slippery Elm can also be used alone for the inflamed gangrenous sores often associated with Diabetes, and for leg ulcers. The use of a Slippery Elm poultice upon the appearance of sores and ulcers can help prevent gangrene.

Slippery Elm and Lobelia: Can be used to treat abscesses, blood poisoning and Rheumatism.

Goldenseal: Is good for inflammations of all kinds.

Lobelia and Charcoal: Charcoal is available in health food stores. These are combined and used to treat insect bites, bee stings, and almost all wounds.

Lobelia and Slippery Elm: Combined to treat abscesses, blood poisoning, and Rheumatism.

Mullein: Is used for inflamed hemorrhoids, lung disorders, mumps, Tonsillitis, and Sore Throat. To make the poultice, mix 4 parts Mullein with 1 part hot apple cider vinegar and 1 part water.

Mustard: This is beneficial for inflammation, lung congestion, and swelling, and can help relax tense muscles. Because Mustard is an irritant, place the mixture between 2 pieces of cloth, rather than placing it in direct contact with the skin.

Onion: Is good for Ear Infections, and for boils and sores that have difficulty healing. To make this poultice, place finely chopped onion between 2 pieces of cloth, rather than placing it in direct contact with the skin.

Pau d’arco, Ragweed, and Wood Sage: Can be combined and used to treat tumors and external cancers.

Poke Root: Is good for an inflamed or sore breast.

Sage: Like poke root, can help relieve breast inflammation and soreness.

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For Guaranteed, Effective, 100% Natural Herbal Remedies , please visit Native Remedies

NaturalEco Organics is where we recommend you go for Organic, natural, chemical-free products and quality remedies for a safe, healthy journey for Mom and Baby, from Pregnancy to baby’s Nursery!

Mountain Rose Herbs is where NHH recommends you purchase all of your Bulk Herbs, Spices, Teas and single oils!

Are you looking for quality Vitamins, diet aids and health Supplements? Visit the Health Supplement Shop - highly recommended by NHH!


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