Olive Oil - Oil Profile

Olive: Olea Europaea

Medicinal Parts: Leaves, bark, fruit.

Description: The olive tree is an evergreen native to the Mediterranean area but widely grown in tropical areas and warm climates.

Properties and Uses:

Leaves: antiseptic, astringent, febrifuge, and tranquilizer.

Oil: cholagogue, demulcent, emollient, laxative. A decoction of the leaves or inner bark of the tree is effective against fever; an infusion of the leaves has a tranquilizing effect helpful for nervous tension. Olive oil taken internally increases the secretion of bile and acts as a laxative by encouraging muscular contraction in the bowels. It is also soothing to mucous membrane and to dissolve cholesterol. Olive oil is useful externally for burns, bruises, insect bites, sprains, and intense itching. With alcohol it makes a good hair tonic, and with oil of rosemary a good treatment for dandruff. One of its most common uses is as a base for liniments and ointments. [1]

It is amazing how many applications there are for olive oil including; skin care, cosmetics, cooking and medicinal. Olive Oil is a staple in the Mediterranean diet and is used more commonly than butter. The use of Olive Oil has been linked to reduced cholesterol and a protection against several types of cancer.

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Anti-bacterial Essential Oils

Please follow appropriate safety warnings. Many of the most effective oils are truly not safe for use on the skin and would do better in a nebulizer. Also, please remember that all oils have some antibacterial/ antimicrobial effect, so oils may be chosen for other reasons and still be effective.

As with any information presented on this page, please use all proper precautions in using these powerful aromatic essences, and consult a medical practitioner when in doubt. We are in no way responsible for misuse of the information presented herein.

* Tea Tree esp. against Staph infections
* Manuka (staph & strep)
* Bay Laurel
* Thyme
* Bergamot
* Dalmatian Sage
* Lavender
* Eucalyptus
* Clove
* Oregano
* Spike Lavender
* Lemon
* Niaouli
* Lemongrass
* Ravensara
* Pine
* Palma Rosa
* Cistus (E-Coli)
* Marjoram
* Peppermint
* Black Pepper
* Cassia
* Patchouli
* Cajeput
* Sandalwood (strep)

Please remember that as more and more infectious conditions become resistant to various antibiotics, the oils seem to retain their effectiveness.

To purchase any of these oils, visit MountainRose Herbs

Originally posted 2007-10-23 09:54:29. We hope you have enjoyed this Post From the Past!


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Herbal Preparation Methods

WATER PREPARATIONS:

Herbs (and nearly all patent medicines as well) work quickest in fluid-filled spaces of the body: hence they are not as effective for bone or cartilidge ailments. Water is, in general, a very good solvent for many of the herb’s properties, but water will not dissolve resins or oils.

Suspended Cold Infusions:

A density-based convection cell is set up–good for leaves, flowers, slimy or mucilaginous roots and barks. This method preserves volatiles & mucopolysaccharides: (Ex.: Althea, Comfrey, Echinacea, slippery Elm bark) Mucopolysaccharides are soothing to mucosa,
stimulate Tcell multiplication, are used in poultices, good for sore throat, UTIs, upset stomach: 1/2 to 1 oz. herbs to quart jar.

Hot Infusions:

Use glass, enamel, stainless steel, or ceramic containers. Boil water, turn off heat, Infuse herbs in covered container. 1 tsp/cup dried herb (or 2 TBL/cup fresh herb) from 5 min.- 10 min for chamomile, mint, or beverage teas (tisanes) 1/2 oz to 1 oz. in 1 pt. to 1 qt. water from 30 mins to overnight for medicinal strength teas. (Ex: Valerian root, Mint, Pau d’Arco; For fennel and chamomile: a few teaspoons are OK.; no long infusions for chamomile or it turns bitter.) It is sensible to make a day’s supply at one time; usually about a quart.

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Basic Candle Making

It is really not that difficult to make your own basic candles! If you are going to be performing any spells or rituals using candles, then to make your own is a good idea, as the candles will pick up your vibrations & will be more pure than ones you buy in a shop, as no-one else has handled them. But always remember, Safety first! Never leave hot wax unattended, always use heat proof gloves when handling container/pot that wax is in & make candles at a time when young children are not around.Alway ensure that you have a good amount of working space as well, to minimise the danger of accidents.

WHAT YOU’LL NEED FOR BASIC CANDLE MAKING

Wax - Paraffin wax is good, Colour - dyes or a cheap alternative is Children’s crayons ( the thicker one are better! ), Wick - you can buy these or make your own by dipping thick string or thin cord into warm wax. Leave to dry on grease-proof paper. Mould - You can buy these from craft stores, or use an old can, as a cheap alternative! A Container for the wax - A double boiler is best to heat the wax in, but failing that, put the wax into an old coffee tin, then into a saucepan filled with water to heat it ( make sure the water doesn’t come up further than your tin though! )

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Oil Measurements and Equivalents

* 3 teaspoons (tsp) = 1 tablespoon (tbls)
* 2 tablespoons (tbls) = 1 ounce (oz)
* 6 teaspoons (tsp) = 1 ounce (oz)
* 10 milliliter (ml) = 1/3 oz.
* 15 milliliter (ml) = 1/2 oz.
* 30 milliliter (ml) = 1 oz.
* 10 milliliter (ml) = approximately 300 drops

Generally 2 drops of Essential Oil should be used per Tsp of Carrier Oil (but follow individual recipes if available.

Generally it takes from 1 to 2 oz of carrier oil for a full body massage.

Generally you can use any kind of natural carrier oil except mineral oil. There are lots to choose from and each has their own properties.

For most applications, I prefer our own Massage Base. It’s a combination of Sweet Almond, Grapeseed and Jojoba oils.

Originally posted 2006-01-14 14:00:33. We hope you have enjoyed this Post From the Past!


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Making Salves

Have you ever thought you would like to make your own balms and salves and put the exact herbs in them that you would like to use? I will give you the basic recipe for making a salve or balm and you can make any herbal salve you would like to have.

First you have to “infuse” the herb in pure olive oil. To do this, fill a canning jar (either pint or quart) almost full with your herb. Then pour pure olive oil over the herb. I like to let mine sit near a heat source, not hot, just warm for a couple of days to get the infusion moving. If you have a pilot light on your stove, you can sit it in the middle of the stove and let it soak up the heat. If not, a window sill in the sun is a good place to put it while it infuses.

After two weeks of infusion you are ready to make your favorite salve or balm.

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How To Clean Your Aura

Our auras are like magnets picking up vibrational energies that are floating around everywhere we go. It is important to cleanse our auras freeing them of foreign vibrations and negative energies. Here are a few simple ways to do it.

Here’s How:

1. Using your fingers as a comb, comb through the space surrounding your body from head to toe. Clean your hands with running water before and after doing this.
2. Stand under a waterfall or shower.
3. Walking in the rainfall.
4. Run freely and playfully in the wind.
5. Using a single feather or feather whisk make sweeping motions through the space surrounding your body.
6. Smudge the area surrounding your body with the smoke from sage, lavendar, and/or sweetgrass.
7. Emerse and soak your body in an epsom salt bath.

Tips:

1. Turkey or owl feathers are especially good feathers to use for sweeping the aura.
2. Take care to do some deep breathing exercises while cleansing your aura to aid in flushing your inner body.
3. Caution: Do not walk in the rain during an electrical storm.

Originally posted 2006-01-19 14:02:02. We hope you have enjoyed this Post From the Past!


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Garlic - Ways To Use For Illness and Injury

First, go to the garden (or the grocery store) and bring home a couple bulbs of garlic. A bulb is the golf-ball size pod of the plant, which can be separated into many cloves�shaped like the individual wedges taken from an orange. Break off two or three large cloves, and lay them on your counter. Set some water on the stove to warm, and then spread out a clean washcloth or double-thick paper towel. Smack the garlic cloves with the bottom of a heavy glass to lightly bruise or crush them. Now the papery skin will come off easily. Take the bruised cloves and dice them up, or smash them in a garlic press so that the juice billows out the familiar aroma that makes you hungry for Lasagna.

Lay the 2-3 tablespoons of minced garlic in the center of your washcloth or paper towel, and fold in the edges of the cloth, creating what I call a �poultice� or �plaster.� Place this garlic pad in a bowl or plate and pour warm (not hot) water over it. Let it sit for 5 seconds or so, then drain and squeeze the excess water out with your hands. Apply the warm (not hot!) poultice to the chest, back, and soles of the feet (alternately) for about 60 seconds each for treatment of any virus, cold, flu, infection, etc…

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The Amazing Benefits of Melaleuca (Tea Tree) Oil

Melaleuca oil, also known as tea tree oil, is truly nature�s natural antiseptic. This topical oil, which comes from an Australian tree called the tea tree, is naturally safe oil that is effective as an antibiotic, anti-viral, and fungicide.

Tea tree oil was first used by the Bundjalung Aborigines living in the Northeast Corner of what is now New South Wales, Australia. They would pick the oil-covered leaves of the tea tree and rub them on their skin to alleviate cuts, bites, burns, and other skin ailments. They made a dressing for wounds by grinding the leaves into a paste. They also crushed the leaves to use as an insect repellant.

There are several kinds of tea trees. Yet, the most potent medicinal oil is called Melaleuca alternifolia.

Dr. A. R. Penfold, a chemist in Sydney, found that tea tree oil was 13 times stronger in killing bacteria than carbolic acid, the universal standard antiseptic in the early 1900�s. The Medical Journal of Australia published a study that tea tree oil was effective in treating pus filled infections of the skin and infected nail beds, and helped speed recovery from sore throats when the oil was gargled. Another study published in the Medical Journal of Australia in 1990 found tea tree oil as effective in treating acne as benzoyl peroxide, with fewer side effects. It is also effective in treating burns, thrush, and bacterial and fungal infections.

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Collecting Wild Herbs

Nature, by its very design, provides a remedy for nearly any disease that may afflict a human being. This being the case, it is essential to know how to acquire and prepare the remedies. Acquisition of herbal remedies in the wild may not be as easy as some may think. If you cannot find the herbals that you are in need of, then you may need to either grow them yourself or buy them. Personally, I prefer to grow my own, for in this way, I am always absolutely certain what has been used to grow and cultivate the plants. Gathering in the wild, growing herbs yourself, or purchasing them from an herbal merchant…each method of acquisition will have certain blessings and curses.

I would imagine that the acquisition through gathering in the wild is probably the most inexpensive way to get the herbs you need. It is also one of the most rewarding and one which requires quite a bit of effort on the part of the gatherer. In some countries, including the US, many of the native wild plants are protected by law. This is a definite damper when it comes to finding these particular plants. It becomes a challenge to overcome this barrier, so that collecting them in quantity can be accomplished. It may be necessary to obtain a special permit to collect certain plants in certain areas.

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