Aromatherapy For Health Blog




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February 15, 2006

The Sense of Smell

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Disturbed vibrations occur in the body as a precursor of illness. Vibrational healing restores the body’s healthy vibrations. Essential Oils can be used to balance the subtle energy flows in the body.

We are surrounded by vibrations at all times. Our ears are tuned to receive sound vibrations, our eyes focus on vibrations of light which allow us to see colour, and our noses detect vibrations of aromatic molecules which allow us to become aware of scents. The most important ingredient in the Aromatherapy treatment is the Essential Oil.

Aromatherapists and perfumeries use musical language to describe scents. We talk of Essential Oils being a top, middle, and base note. About a century ago, a perfumery named Piesse arranged scents on a stave, or musical scale, and this went some way to describing the vibration of scents.

Aromas were also described by colour. Scents can be described as ‘green’ or ‘Blue’ or perhaps ‘vivid red’, and we mix scents as we would, colour on an artist’s palette.

Historically, the sense of smell has always been important to man and to his survival. A Newborn baby recognises his mother mainly by scent until his eyesight improves and he learns to focus.

To early man, his sense of smell was every bit as important as what it is to animals. Humans and animals alike emit pheromones (from the Greek ‘pherein’ to carry and ‘hormon’ to excite) which attract, repel, identify or mark territory.

Human pheromones are chemicals manufactured by the apocrine glands and radiated into the air around us. The scent of these are detected by the people in our immediate vicinity and play a large part in sexual attraction. Although we are all radiate pheromones and react to other people’s pheromones, this function takes place on a subconscious level.

As the pheromones we produce are affected by fluctuations in other hormone levels, they can indicate our emotional state. For instance, the surge of adrenalin produced in times of Anxiety can produce a smell of fear. Animals are highly receptive to scents and can easily detect emotion in humans.

Apocrine glands are also located on the soles of the feet and pheromone molecules can remain on the ground for up to two weeks. Primitive tribes have, until comparatively recently, detected the proximity of other people by sniffing the ground.

It is only the process of ‘civilisation’ that has blunted our sense of smell and with it our innate knowledge that scents produce profound responses within us.

Although early man used his sense of smell for survival and reproduction in much the same way as other animals, our present culture pays little attention to the sense of smell in its natural, emotional, feeling sense. We mainly use the sense of smell in a cosmetic way. Spraying and powdering ourselves to remove or mask our natural scents. We have for so long subdued our senses by the constraints of reason and the rational mind, that we have lost touch with our spiritual nature. We no longer give freedom to the inner, unseen realms of the mind and the subtle communications of the psyche.

The importance of the effects of scents on the human psyche has been gradually eroded. At one time, Incense was burned on temple altars on a daily basis (it is still used today as an important part of some religious services); fragrant Herbs and flowers were strewn on the floor of a dwelling. Odours were often associated with illness and disease. An evil smell was so much a part of the plague that it was believed to be one of the earliest symptoms. It had an odour that was foul and distinctive. The breath of plague victims was described by physicians of the time as that of ‘rotten flesh’ or ‘corrupt cadavers’.

Because breathing in the foul stench was thought to be one of the methods of contracting the disease, those who were still healthy carried nosegays and pomanders of highly perfumed flowers and Spices. By holding these to the nose they believed that they were warding off infection carried in the venomous air. In the Middle Ages, and even later, pleasant smells were considered to be an important part of good health and immunity to disease. During the 1348 plague, French physicians prescribed breathing in cold aromatics like roses, Sandalwood, renuphar, vinegar, Rose-water, camphor and chilled apples for summertime protection. And in the winter, hot aromatics like aloe, amber, sweetgum and Nutmeg.

Another physician prescribed that “The heart must be eased by external bathing and internally with syrups and other medicines. All such preparations must contain some perfume and some aroma, like the fragrance of the Lemon tree, syrup of apples and lemons and the acid of pomegranate”. Another recommended that the house and the body should be kept clean; the rooms of the house should be ventilated, sprinkled with vinegar and filled with scented flowers and plants. It should be “perfumed with good smells. So let vine leaves, sweet rushes, willow and osier, small plants and leaves of the Lemon tree and all other green things like flowers and sweet-smelling pommes be strewn throughout and placed in the corners and on the walls of the chambers”.

Unfortunately, the bodily cleanliness did not include the use of water. In fact, washing and bathing was considered a dangerous practice at times, as it opened the pores and allowed the odorous, plague-ridden air to enter the body more easily. The hands and face were cleansed with aromatic lotions and frequent changes of clothing, with abundant use of perfumes, were considered to be indispensable. Physicians recommended that their bodies be washed in tepid vinegar twice a day.

There was also thought to be an odour of sanctity, saints and mystics were considered to emanate sweet odours of violets, roses, Cinnamon and Cloves. This sweet odour was noted even after death and remains of saints were alleged to have given off sweet floral odours many years after death. Pope Benedict XIV stated “That the human body may by nature not have an overtly unpleasant odour is possible, but that it should actually have a pleasing smell – that is beyond nature. If such an agreeable odour exists, whether there does or does not exist a natural cause capable of producing it, it must be owing to some higher course and thus deemed to be miraculous”. Therefore the pleasant odour of the saint is seen as evidence of sanctity.

hroughout the ages, scents and odours have had a deep and profound effect on the human psyche. Suskind says “For scent was a brother breath. Together with breath it entered human beings who could not defend themselves against it, not if they wanted to live. And scent entered into their very core, went directly to their hearts and decided for good and all between affection and contempt, disgust and lust, love and hate, the who ruled scent ruled the hearts of men.”

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For Guaranteed, Effective, 100% Natural Herbal Remedies , please visit Native Remedies.

ReflexAromas is where you can find Quality Reflexology Tools, specially-formulated Essential Oil blends for a variety of health conditions, Massage Therapy tools and Crystals.

NaturalEco Organics is where we recommend you go for Organic, natural, chemical-free products and quality remedies for a safe, healthy journey for Mom and Baby, from Pregnancy to baby’s Nursery!

Mountain Rose Herbs is where we recommend you purchase all of your Bulk Herbs, Spices, Teas and single oils!

Are you looking for quality Vitamins, diet aids and health Supplements? Visit the Health Supplement Shop – highly recommended!

February 14, 2006

The Sense of Smell and Emotional Response

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Smell is a specialised chemical sense. It is interesting to note that the olfactory cells are the only place in the human body where the central nervous system is in direct contact with the external environment. When we detect the smell of something, there is a direct contact between the molecules of scent and our own receptors.

The message regarding the molecule of scent is passed along the olfactory nerve to the nerve centre in the brain. The neurons of the olfactory nerve, control the inner responses, i.e. emotions and memories, as well as the body’s hormones. There is no generally accepted classification of the basic types of smells recognized by man. The sense of smell can be very sensitive, sensing minute concentrations of some substances in the air.

There is considerable individual variation in the activity of the sense of smell. Adaption can occur to pleasant as well as nasty smells, due to changes in both the receptors and the central connections.

It is important to remember that the inhalation of the aromas of Essential Oils also has a profound and instantaneous effect on us today. The limbic lobe of the brain receives information about smell via the olfactory nerve and this part of the brain is also concerned with our emotional memory. The limbic system produces the autonomic responses that accompany emotional states and behaviours.

Particular scents can trigger strong, emotional responses which are pleasant or unpleasant according to our own individual experience. Which smells do you find repellent? What are your favourite scents? Perhaps the perfume of a favourite Blossom or newly-mown grass, the scents of the garden after light summer rain, the smell of your favourite meal cooking or the perfume worn by a friend, the special scent of a baby or small child.

When oils are inhaled, micro-molecules of Essential Oils travel through the nasal passages to the limbic system of the brain which is the seat of memory and emotion.

The breathing in of Essential Oils is thought to trigger memories and emotions within the limbic system, which in turn stimulates a response within the entire system.

With the memory comes instant recall of the associated emotion – pleasure, happiness, laughter, affection or perhaps sadness, pain, grief.

For this reason, it is important to always heed the emotional responses to the aroma of the Essential Oils you intend to use. If the scent is in any way repellent, then it is wise to adjust your choice of oils for your blend. The subconscious, emotional responses are telling you something of vital importance and you would be wise to listen. Otherwise, you severely curtail the degree of benefit given.

Smell takes a direct, physical route to the brain because they employ nerve cells as transmitters and receivers. Odours travel directly through the olfactory system in the nose and the front part of the head into the limbic area of the brain which processes the smell.

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For Guaranteed, Effective, 100% Natural Herbal Remedies , please visit Native Remedies.

ReflexAromas is where you can find Quality Reflexology Tools, specially-formulated Essential Oil blends for a variety of health conditions, Massage Therapy tools and Crystals.

NaturalEco Organics is where we recommend you go for Organic, natural, chemical-free products and quality remedies for a safe, healthy journey for Mom and Baby, from Pregnancy to baby’s Nursery!

Mountain Rose Herbs is where we recommend you purchase all of your Bulk Herbs, Spices, Teas and single oils!

Are you looking for quality Vitamins, diet aids and health Supplements? Visit the Health Supplement Shop – highly recommended!

February 8, 2006

The Mind-Smell Connection

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Why is smell so strongly linked to memory and emotion?

It is not fully understood, but this is no surprise as the complexities of brain activity are still far from being unravelled and understood. The brain holds far more secrets than we have discovered. What is known is that the sense of smell is registered in a part of the brain which was already developed in our earliest ancestors.

The limbic area of the brain was well developed before man had the power of speech or was able to make tools. The limbic area is concerned with all those activities vital to survival in a sometimes hostile world: sleep, hunger, thirst, memory, sexual response and, or course, smell are all affected by the limbic system.

As modern man developed the ‘higher’ senses and the brain became larger to accommodate development of speech, intellect and creativity, the ancient knowledge became blunted or buried deep in the unconscious and the limbic area of the brain lost some of its importance. But that ancient knowledge is still there and needs only to be re-awakened.

Essential Oils have the power to re-awaken and stimulate the limbic system and the aromas can be used to excellent effect by the aromatherapist. They also have the power to balance the two hemisphere of the brain. It is known that the left hemisphere of the brain is concerned with logic and intellect, whilst the right is concerned with intuition.

When both hemispheres are in harmony and balanced, we experience feelings of calm and well-being. As we inhale the balancing Essential Oils, the two hemispheres of the brain come into closer symmetry, whilst the stimulating Essential Oils make us feel mentally alert and the sedating oils promote deeper feeling of relaxation. The relationship between the brain, the mind and the body is of vital importance in aromatherapy.

When we send pleasing, relaxing messages to the brain during aromatherapy massage, the hypothalamus receives impulses signalling safety and harmony and, in its turn, the body receives the signal that all is well and that the body and mind are in balance.

The effects of Essential Oils and massage on the various activities of the nervous system form a major part of aromatherapy. We use analgesic oils to relieve pain by damping down the activity of the pain-transmitting nerve endings.

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For Guaranteed, Effective, 100% Natural Herbal Remedies , please visit Native Remedies.

ReflexAromas is where you can find Quality Reflexology Tools, specially-formulated Essential Oil blends for a variety of health conditions, Massage Therapy tools and Crystals.

NaturalEco Organics is where we recommend you go for Organic, natural, chemical-free products and quality remedies for a safe, healthy journey for Mom and Baby, from Pregnancy to baby’s Nursery!

Mountain Rose Herbs is where we recommend you purchase all of your Bulk Herbs, Spices, Teas and single oils!

Are you looking for quality Vitamins, diet aids and health Supplements? Visit the Health Supplement Shop – highly recommended!

February 5, 2006

Benefits of Aromatherapy and Massage

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Alzheimer’s and Dementia
As well as using the therapeutic properties of the oils themselves, Aromatherapy and massage can be used to promote relaxation, lower Anxiety and add to the quality of life for people suffering from Dementia. Massage has been used successfully to help reduce the effects of aggression (Snyder 1995), and disturbed behaviour in individuals with severe Dementia (Brooker et al. 1997).

There is also much work being done into smell-memory to help with maintaining and reinforcing the short term memory process which is the most distressing symptoms of Dementia-related illnesses.

People with Dementia often feel confused and anxious – a gentle hand massage can evoke feelings of comfort and safety, particularly if used with a favourite scent reminiscent of childhood or their favourite perfume.

Antifungal action
Tea Tree has been proven to be effective in the treatment of Acne, athletes foot, and onychomycosis nail infections (Bassett et al. 1990 and Duck et al. 1994).

Arthritis
Massage has an immediate effect on reducing cortisone levels (stress-related hormone) in children with juvenile rheumatoid Arthritis, and also lowered their self and parental assessed perceived pain levels over a 30 day massage programme (Field et al. 1997).

Asthma
A 20 minute massage routine every day before bedtime has been found to improve the pulmonary function of children with Asthma (Field et al. 1997 c)

Autism
Massage Therapy can help with touch sensitivity, attention to sounds and tasks, and with pupil-teacher interaction (Field et al. (a)1997).

Many people with severe learning disabilities have a dysfunctional sensory system (Hatch-Rasmussen 1995, p1).

Autistic individuals are more than likely to rely on only one style of learning (Edelson 1999, p1), either visually, auditory, hands-on, or tactile. The experience of massage stimulates all the senses to help reinforce the learning process through tactile (touch); auditory (background music); olfactory (smell) and the tactile experience (the Interactive Sequence). It helps make the recipient feel safe and comfortable, enables the building of a relationship, and can initiate the process of developing effective communication.

Cancer and palliative care
Previously it was thought that massage was inappropriate for Cancer patients as it would ‘spread’ the Cancer. Nowadays, aromatherapy and massage are used alongside conventional medicine to help treat nausea, promote relaxation, and improve quality of life, particularly in palliative care.

The Marie Curie Cancer Care centre in London has conducted clinical trials showing statistically significant improvement in Cancer patients receiving massage with an Essential Oil (Internet health library Cancer Research No date).

Complementary therapies including aromatherapy massage have a positive role to play in managing fatigue and Anxiety in Cancer patients (Maguire 1995).

The Essential Oils Lavender, Marjoram and Roman Chamomile (no botanical names available) have also been used with massage to significantly help relaxation and Anxiety levels in palliative care among 69 individuals self-assessing the benefits of a trial in palliative care (Evans 1995, Wilkinson 1995).

Unspecified oils with massage have also been shown to help with short term pain relief in Cancer patients (Weinrich et al. 1990).

Challenging behaviour
Some people with learning disabilities are very difficult to reach, particularly those with no verbal language skills, severe learning disabilities or an Autistic spectrum disorder. Aromatherapy and massage can be used to facilitate communication, help to build relationships, reduce difficult and self stimulating behaviour, and offer more meaningful communication. The lack of appropriate tactile stimulation can contribute towards excessive self-stimulating and challenging behaviour. (McCray 1978).

The relaxation produced during a massage session can help to reduce challenging behaviour by reducing Anxiety and stress levels (Bijou 1996). For clients with profound and multiple handicaps, massage and the use of aromatic oils can stimulate the senses and add to quality of life.

Healing
Due to their chemical make-up, Essential Oils have many natural antibiotic, antifungal, Antiseptic and antiviral properties.

The use of appropriate oils applied with massage can help relieve aching joints and contribute towards mobility and skin integrity (Hitchen 1993).

Some Essential Oils and Carrier Oils are particularly suitable for use with dry or mature skin. Essential Oils and massage can also help eliminate Toxins from the body by stimulating Circulation and lymphatic drainage (McGuinness 1998).

Interaction
Aromatherapy and massage offer an ideal medium with which to achieve some of the intensive interaction sequences outlined in Hewett et al. (1993) ‘Access to Communication’. Hewett outlines a method of working with the severely disabled and withdrawn client by meeting them first on their terms, slowly bringing them out by interacting at an enjoyable level to encourage participation and communication.
Irritable Bowel Syndrome

The oral intake of Peppermint oil has been shown to help people with Irritable Bowel Syndrome (Dew et al. 1984).

Pain relief
Research has shown that Lavender oil (Angustifolia) can reduce pain (Wollfson et al. 1992), and can also be used to reduce stress and Anxiety (Buckle 1993).

A 20 minute foot massage using Lavender oil with intensive and coronary care patients showed a reduction in heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure and perceived pain (Wollfson et al. 1992).

Lower back pain can also be immediately helped with lower back massage (Ernst 1999), and Lavender oil (unspecified) has been show to reduced perennial discomfort over a 5 day period of use after Childbirth (Dale et al. 1994).

Relaxation
Through using EEG testing, the Essential Oils of Ylang Ylang and Rosemary have been shown to influence Alpha-wave activity (Alpha-waves are induced by relaxation), Rosemary suppressing activity, while Ylang Ylang causing an increase – in line with the direction expected by their anticipated therapeutic properties (Jacob 2000).

Sedation
The sedative effects of Lavender inhalation (non specified species) have been proven in work by Buchbauer et al. 1991, and 1993) when investigating the linalool content. Linalool is a terpenoid constituent that his lipophilic (interacts with cell membranes to suppress cell action (Teuscher et al. 1990), the effects being mildly sedative in nature.

Stress and relaxation
Aromatherapy massage has long been used to help promote relaxation and treat stress – many illnesses of the mind and body are a result of inability to cope with stress therefore aromatherapy has much to contribute in maintaining health both physically and psychologically.

Massage will relax both the mind and body – massaging with Essential Oils enables relaxation and a feeling of well-being inevitable leading to a reduction in stress and Anxiety. Clients will also benefit from the therapeutic relationship with their therapist. Friction from massage on the skin can stimulate or relax the body muscles (depending on the sort of massage and oils used), increase blood flow to peripheral areas, lower blood pressure and heart beat.

Massage with Neroli has been shown to have a significant psychological benefit when used over a 5-day period with post cardiac surgery patients (Stevenson 1994).

Touch
Touch is a way of connecting, exchanging information, and building a relationship – this forms the basis of all communication and is central to our work with all people who have severe learning difficulties (Sanderson et al. 1997).

Touch and smell are vital in order to understand the environment. They are also a basic behavioural need. Touch contributes towards a multi-sensory approach to help those with sensory impairment. It is supportive and comforting; it can help develop trust and relationships, so adding to quality of life (Nind et al. 1998).

The RCCM gives dozens of abstracts and references for research on touch (http://www.rccm.org.uk/massagetouch.htm)

Trust
Massage can also be used as a way of building up a relationship and developing trust between a client with learning disabilities and a key worker. Sanderson et al. (1997) talks about ‘interactive massage’ with people who have learning disabilities (page 7, 74 and 77) where massage is used as a communication tool to share, learn to trust, and help release emotions.

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For Guaranteed, Effective, 100% Natural Herbal Remedies , please visit Native Remedies.

ReflexAromas is where you can find Quality Reflexology Tools, specially-formulated Essential Oil blends for a variety of health conditions, Massage Therapy tools and Crystals.

NaturalEco Organics is where we recommend you go for Organic, natural, chemical-free products and quality remedies for a safe, healthy journey for Mom and Baby, from Pregnancy to baby’s Nursery!

Mountain Rose Herbs is where we recommend you purchase all of your Bulk Herbs, Spices, Teas and single oils!

Are you looking for quality Vitamins, diet aids and health Supplements? Visit the Health Supplement Shop – highly recommended!

Modern History of Aromatherapy

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Towards the end of the 19th Century, as a French chemist, Professor Rene Gattefosse, accidentally discovered the healing power of Lavender essence, when he plunged his hand into a bowl of Lavender oil after receiving a bad burn.

The burn healed quickly, without forming a blister or leaving a Scar. He then began many years of research into the healing properties of Essential Oils. His knowledge increased further when he treated soldiers wounded during the 1914 – 1918 war and in 1928 he gave his treatment the name “Aromatherapie”.

His work was later extended by Dr. Jean Valnet, a French physician, who used Essential Oils to treat cancers, tuberculosis, Diabetes and other serious illnesses. He claimed many successes.

Marguerite Maury followed him, a French biochemist and beautician, who further developed massage techniques and skin-care treatments using Essential Oils. She continued to further develop and work in the field of aromatherapy until she died in 1968 at the age of 73.

Interest in aromatherapy has continued to grow and today, rightly, it has a massive following.

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For Guaranteed, Effective, 100% Natural Herbal Remedies , please visit Native Remedies.

ReflexAromas is where you can find Quality Reflexology Tools, specially-formulated Essential Oil blends for a variety of health conditions, Massage Therapy tools and Crystals.

NaturalEco Organics is where we recommend you go for Organic, natural, chemical-free products and quality remedies for a safe, healthy journey for Mom and Baby, from Pregnancy to baby’s Nursery!

Mountain Rose Herbs is where we recommend you purchase all of your Bulk Herbs, Spices, Teas and single oils!

Are you looking for quality Vitamins, diet aids and health Supplements? Visit the Health Supplement Shop – highly recommended!

The Ancient History of Essential Oils

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Nobody knows exactly where and when the healing art of aromatherapy began. Nevertheless, it has its roots in the rites and rituals of earliest mankind. By analysis of fossilised pollens found in ancient habitation and burial sites of early humans, scientists have discovered traces of plant that have known medicinal properties.

At least some of these properties must have been evident to these early people, who would have made the discovery either by accident or by observation. Early man would soon have recognised which leaves, berries, fruit or roots encouraged wounds to heal or sickness to improve. He would also have observed which plants sick animals sought out and ate. They discovered startling proof of the early use of plants by Neanderthal man in 1975 at a cave site in Iraq.

Scientific excavation showed signs of human habitation for 60 000 years and the discoveries there have been some of the most significant and important finds to date. At this site in 1975, the burial of a Neanderthal adult male was discovered. The subsequent soil analysis showed pollen evidence that the body had been placed on a bed of a type of woody Horsetail plant and that it had been buried with a wreath of flowers. The plants used for the wreath are all well known today and still used for their medicinal properties.

They include Yarrow, groundsel, cornflower, St. Barnaby’s thistle, grape, hyacinth and hollyhock. As several of these plants are known to have wound healing and fever reducing properties, it is tempting to think that they were used for those same properties by the Neanderthal man, who, far from being a lumbering cretinous creature, had now been shown to have been a thinking, feeling being as demonstrated by the care of the burial ritual.

Early man would also have observed that the smoke from his fire could produce various effects. Some woods or bushes, when burnt and the smoke inhaled, can produce drowsiness, some excitement and others hallucinations. Little wonder that smoke and fire were considered magical and formed an integral part of many rituals. They thought that some wood smoke was beneficial and the ‘smoking’ by sick people was an early medical treatment.

Fumigation with aromatic plants and woods has been an accepted medical practice for thousands of years and is still used in some parts of the world today. Until as recent as, early 20th Century hospitals in Europe burnt Rosemary and Thyme as a disinfectant. Deliberate cultivation of plants began with Neolithic man and the plants cultivated included the poppy. It seems highly unlikely that early man was aware of the narcotic effects.

The white spotted red mushroom (Fly Agaric), beloved of all illustrators of children’s fairy tales, was another of the earliest substances used by man for its hallucinatory effects. Perhaps this explains its connection with fairies and magical tales. The hallucinatory effects were evident in some of Alice’s experiences in Wonderland! Lewis Carroll was known to have studied the effects of Fly Agaric.

Evidence of the widespread use of aromatic plant substances was seen in the tomb paintings of the ancient Egyptians 5000 years ago. Plant substances were used not only for medicinal, but also for perfumes and cosmetics, in preservation and preparation of food to enhance flavour and aid digestion.

They were also used for their anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties to stave off illness and epidemic. Some were even found to have contraceptive qualities. The ancient Egyptians practised a sophisticated level of medicine and many of the plants that they used are today recognised as beneficial in the treatment of certain diseases. Their surgeons even developed techniques for successful brain surgery. Evidence of this has been found on many mummified remains, which show clear signs of skull surgery in which the bones of the skull had healed and knitted together some considerable time before death.

They cultivated fields of fruits and vegetables and gardens of Herbs. Plant substances were used extensively in pills, potions, pastes, ointments, infusions, poultices, powders and suppositories. And when the ancient Egyptian died, plant substances, bitumen’s and resins were used in the most important ritual of all – embalming his body so that his Ba, or spirit, could live for eternity. The embalming of royal bodies and High Court dignitaries involved the removal of the internal organs, which they embalmed separately and stored in canopic jars for later burial in the tomb.

The intestinal cavity was cleaned with palm wine and all hollow parts of the body were filled with aromatics and Spices. The body was dry-salted and left for 70 days. They then wrapped the body with gummed bandages and prepared it for the funeral procession to the tomb.

The famous Egyptologist, Howard Carter, who discovered the tomb of Tutankhamen, was profoundly moved when the sarcophagus of the king, who was 18 years old at the time of his death, was opened revealing the dried well-preserved flower garlands draped around his neck. These would have been placed in the tomb by the hands of his young widowed queen, whose footprints were still clearly visible in the undisturbed dust in the tomb. T

hree thousand years slipped away and, it seemed to Carter, that the young queen had stepped out of the tomb only moments before. He was acutely aware that he was, breathing the very air that had last been breathed by the ancient mourners. Although Tutankhamen died at a very young age.

Many of the ancient people’s life span must have increased considerably if we consider the medicinal properties of the commonly used plants used by the Egyptians and other ancient civilisations – for example, the Greeks, Romans and Mesopatanians. Noting how very familiar these plants are to us today is interesting.

Consider this list: rhubarb watermelon Garlic Coriander cedar grapes Cumin Cypress olives onions Thyme Mustard apples roses caraway Fennel saffron Juniper quince Angelica Marjoram mint Parsley radishes leeks Bay Tarragon Ginger Cinnamon aniseed Frankincense poppy Yarrow

As the Roman Empire expanded, their knowledge spread widely and probably arrived in Britain with the Roman legions. In the 11th Century Arabia, Avicenna, the famous court physician recorded his use of over 800 plants in his treatments. Historically, he is an important figure in the later development of Aromatherapy because he used massage and manipulation as part of his treatment.

He was also largely responsible for the refining of distillation techniques to derive oils from plants. Medieval Europe saw the use of plants in infusions, pills, potions, pomanders and nosegays, which were sniffed as protection against epidemic and pestilence. The Herbs Lavender, Sage and Rosemary were used widely to scent linen and to protect materials against moths.

Herbs were strewn on the floors of dwellings to perfume rooms and repel fleas, flies and ticks. In times of plague, bonfires were lit at intervals along the streets in the belief that the smoke would act as a powerful disinfectant and would give some protection against infection.

Although many uses of plants through the centuries would have been extremely effective, some were not and this type of fumigation during the times of the bubonic plague would provably have been useless.

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For Guaranteed, Effective, 100% Natural Herbal Remedies , please visit Native Remedies.

ReflexAromas is where you can find Quality Reflexology Tools, specially-formulated Essential Oil blends for a variety of health conditions, Massage Therapy tools and Crystals.

NaturalEco Organics is where we recommend you go for Organic, natural, chemical-free products and quality remedies for a safe, healthy journey for Mom and Baby, from Pregnancy to baby’s Nursery!

Mountain Rose Herbs is where we recommend you purchase all of your Bulk Herbs, Spices, Teas and single oils!

Are you looking for quality Vitamins, diet aids and health Supplements? Visit the Health Supplement Shop – highly recommended!

The Therapy That Makes Scents

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by Corinne Friedman

The pure essences distilled from aromatic plants have been prized for their health-giving qualities for thousands of years. Using the beneficial properties of oils, you can treat common ailments, promote good health and emotional well-being, and enhance every aspect of your life. These potent, volatile essences are nature’s gift to mind, body, and spirit.

Essential Oils can evoke smell imagery; sometimes the smell of a certain aroma can instantly bring back memories of a childhood scene. Some scents can make us feel relaxed while others can make us feel energized and alive—this is the power of aroma.

For centuries it has been common knowledge that scents produce mental and physical responses. Using plant, flower, and spice essences for Beauty treatments (and to help with physical ailments) is common and has been practiced since ancient times.

Today, aromatherapy is moving out of the “health alternatives” and into the mainstream, such as in the workplace (to improve productivity, especially in the afternoon, when companies release Lemon or Peppermint through vent ducts – a great “pick-me-up”!). Airlines and hotels are also looking at aromatherapy as a jet-lag cure.

Some believe that Essential Oils contain the vital force of plants, hormones, Vitamins, enzymes, Minerals, and the consciousness of the plant. They provide a therapeutic effect by elevating or suppressing action within the body. The oils enhance brain wave functions and improve psychic and spiritual awareness, working directly with the sensory motor system, and thus bringing balance to the body.

The chemical components of the oils, after analysis, show that they have anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, anti-viral, and anti-parasitic qualities. Many of the oils also support the function of the Immune System by acting as an Antiseptic and healing agent. Additionally, some oils can affect the hormonal system, while others can stimulate an opening to emotional blocks.

I have witnessed the profound effects of Essential Oils, creating mental, emotional, and physical shifts. People report feeling more joyful, happier, and uplifted. I like applying Lemongrass on the pulse points, such as the temples, wrists, and ankles to enhance emotional expression. In addition, rubbing Lavender on the feet aids in relaxation and promotes balance.

Essential Oils have a tremendous affect on our bodies, and will continue to play a major role in our health preservation during these times of increasing disease and stress. Sometimes the quality of Essential Oils can vary greatly. Because Essential Oils carry specific vibratory frequency, they must be of excellent quality.

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For Guaranteed, Effective, 100% Natural Herbal Remedies , please visit Native Remedies.

ReflexAromas is where you can find Quality Reflexology Tools, specially-formulated Essential Oil blends for a variety of health conditions, Massage Therapy tools and Crystals.

NaturalEco Organics is where we recommend you go for Organic, natural, chemical-free products and quality remedies for a safe, healthy journey for Mom and Baby, from Pregnancy to baby’s Nursery!

Mountain Rose Herbs is where we recommend you purchase all of your Bulk Herbs, Spices, Teas and single oils!

Are you looking for quality Vitamins, diet aids and health Supplements? Visit the Health Supplement Shop – highly recommended!

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